African American Slave Narratives: An Anthology - Vol. 3

By Sterling Lecater Bland Jr. | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

a

Abramson, Doris M. “William Wells Brown: America’s First Negro Playwright.” Educational Theatre Journal 20 (1968): 370–75.

Andrews, William L., ed. From Fugitive Slave to Free Man: The Autobiographies of William Wells Brown. New York: Mentor Books, 1993.

———. “Inter(racial)textuality in Nineteenth-Century Southern Narrative.” In Influence and Intertextuality in Literary History, edited by Jay Clayton and Eric Rothstein, 298–317. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1991.

———. “Mark Twain and James W. C. Pennington: Huckleberry Finn’s Smallpox Lie.” Studies in American Fiction 9 (Spring1981): 103–12.

———. “Mark Twain, William Wells Brown, and the Problem of Authority in New South Writing.” In Southern Literature and Literary Practice, edited by Jefferson Humphries, 1–21. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1990.

———. To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, 1760–1865. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1986.

———, ed . Two Biographies by African-American Women. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Aptheker, Herbert. American Negro Slave Revolts. New York: International Publishers, 1983.

———. Essays in the History of the American Negro. New York: International Publishers, 1945.

———. Nat Turner’s Slave Rebellion. Together with the Full Text of the So-Called “Confessions” of Nat Turner Made in Prison in 1831. New York: Humanities Press, 1966.


b

Bancroft, Frederic. Slave Trading in the Old South. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996.

Barbour, James. “Nineteenth Century Black Novelists: A Checklist.” Minority Voices 3 (1980): 27–43.

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African American Slave Narratives: An Anthology - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • 12 - JOHN THOMPSON 617
  • 13 - AUSTIN STEWARD 693
  • 14 - REVEREND NOAH DAVIS 855
  • 15 - WILLIAM AND ELLEN CRAFT 891
  • 16 - JAMES MARS 947
  • Editorial Notes to Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom 942
  • Bibliography 969
  • Index 981
  • About the Editor 1005
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