Just Tell Them I Survived! Women in Antarctica

By Robin Burns | Go to book overview

TWO
‘I had this dream …’

What accounts for the human desire to explore? In childhood, we read about the discoveries and conquerors of ‘new worlds’, in books like Famous Voyages of the Great Discoverers.1 Australian children of my 1940s and 1950s generation inherited the stories of the fifteenth- and sixteenth-century European voyagers, extended through the Australian Broadcasting Commission's Argonauts' Club. Then there was the land-based exploration of Australia, a dull classroom topic with dotted and crossed lines on the map sometimes merely stopping somewhere inland. The excitement of new conquests was contrasted with the dutiful, even futile, mapping of our own land.

Discovery, conquest, political rivalry, greed, exploitation: these colour the stories of human movement and conquest. But tales of the human spirit—pushing back the known, leaping into the unknown—are a never-failing drawcard, whether they are viewed comfortably from the outside, or lead to a feeling stirring deep within: the call to go ourselves, to find new frontiers, fresh challenges, further limits. The Antarctic has been regarded as a mythical place for centuries—Terra australis incognita2— and the story of its discovery and exploration is an important part of that myth. Pyne suggests an explanation echoed by others who encounter Antarctica: ‘The Ice, by contrast, was an information sink. The explorer was compelled to look not out, but inward.

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Just Tell Them I Survived! Women in Antarctica
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.