The Media & Communications in Australia

By Stuart Cunningham; Graeme Turner | Go to book overview

21
Youth media
Jason Sternberg

Youth has become a battlefield on which the current generation of adolescents, baby boomers, parents and corporate media interests are fighting for control of its meanings, investments and powers, fighting to articulate and thereby construct its experiences, identities, practices, discourses and social differences. (Grossberg 1992, p 183)

If the 1990s can be characterised as a decade obsessed with images of youth and youth culture, then one of the forces driving this obsession was the many labels given to young people, such as Generation X, Generation Y, Generation T (for technology), the Nintendo Generation and Techno Teens. Media literacy is central to visions of the various groups (Wark 1993; Ritchie 1995). Young people today are characterised as media citizens (Brabazon 1997), using and manipulating media to build identities. The 1990s have also seen concerns raised about the impact of convergence and new technologies such as video games, computers, the Internet and mobile phones on young people, fuelled by images of hackers, Internet and mobile phone addicts, victims of cyberstalking and socially outcast teenage males downloading bomb-making instructions from the World Wide Web to emulate violence such the US Columbine High School killings.

However, while young people and the media became the objects of much hype, youth and its relationship with the media is also a significantly underdeveloped branch of media and communication studies. Children's television, in particular, is the topic of considerable research and policy interest. However, Australian media researchers appear to be reluctant about examining teenagers and the media. The situation only appears worse with 18–24-year-olds, who straddle the categories of teen and young adult and, until recently (Sternberg 1998; Burton 2000), were virtually absent from the literature.

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The Media & Communications in Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Contributors xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • Part One - Introduction *
  • 1 - The Media and Communications in Australia Today 3
  • Part Two - Approaches *
  • 2 - Media and Communications: Theoretical Traditions 23
  • 3 - Political Economy and News 35
  • 4 - Policy 48
  • 5 - Textual Analysis 62
  • 6 - Representation 72
  • 7 - Audiences 85
  • Part Three - Industries *
  • 8 - The Press 101
  • Notes 115
  • 9 - Telecommunications and the New Economy 117
  • 10 - Radio 133
  • 11 - Film and Video 152
  • 12 - Television and Pay TV 173
  • Notes 186
  • 13 - Magazines 188
  • Notes 199
  • 14 - Advertising 200
  • 15 - Public Relations 217
  • 16 - Popular Music 226
  • 17 - The Internet and Online Communication 244
  • 18 - Video and Computer Gaming 258
  • Part Four - Issues *
  • 19 - Media Ethics After ‘Cash for Comment’ 277
  • 20 - New Media and New Audiences 293
  • 21 - Youth Media 304
  • 22 - The Future of Journalism 320
  • 23 - The Future of Public Broadcasting 330
  • Reference 344
  • Index 370
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