Window on Freedom: Race, Civil Rights, and Foreign Affairs, 1945-1988

By Brenda Gayle Plummer | Go to book overview

Segregationists and the World
The Foreign Policy of the White Resistance
THOMAS NOER

As he waited for his ride to Rockefeller Center, George Wallace was nervous. In his first term as governor of Alabama he had become the leading symbol of the white resistance to the civil rights movement and was considering running for the presidency in 1964. In a few days he would fulfill his campaign promise to “stand in the schoolhouse door” to prevent black students from enrolling at the University of Alabama. But first he faced a panel of journalists on NBC's nationally televised Meet the Press.

Wallace did not fear questions on race or segregation, but, as a potential presidential contender, was certain he would be asked his views on foreign affairs. In frustration, Wallace turned to aide Grover Hall: “They're going to want to know about my foreign policy. If I'm going to run for the presidency next year I've got to have a foreign policy!” Hall rummaged through some clippings on international issues from the Wall Street Journal and handed them to the governor. After his TV appearance, a smiling Wallace shouted to Hall: “I don't need a foreign policy! All they wanted to know about was niggers, and I'm the expert!” 1 Wallace was essentially correct. Opponents of the civil rights movement largely concentrated on the single issue of resisting racial equality. Despite this fundamental focus, segregationists eventually turned their attention to U.S. foreign policy in an effort to justify and to gain support for their battle to preserve white supremacy.

The foreign policy of the segregationists was never elaborate or comprehensive. They offered no detailed position papers on diplomatic issues or proposed any major policy initiatives. Their analysis of foreign affairs was a mixture of paranoia and pragmatism. They saw themselves as a besieged minority under attack by black demonstrators and a hostile government at home and by an alliance of antagonistic nations abroad. Resistance leaders argued that the source of this assault was an international conspiracy dedicated to inciting racial conflict to divide and weaken America. Their claim of a nefarious global plot against segregation was accompanied by a very practical decision that they could use Cold War anticommunism to gain support for their domestic agenda.

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Window on Freedom: Race, Civil Rights, and Foreign Affairs, 1945-1988
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.