Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 3

By St Augustine; John W. Rettig | Go to book overview

TRACTATE 50

On John 11.55-12.11

TODAY'S READING, about which we shall speak what the Lord will give, follows yesterday's reading of the holy Gospel, about which we spoke what the Lord gave. Certain sentences in the Scriptures are so evident that they ask for a listener rather than an exegete; we need not delay on these so that there is sufficient time for the ones on which we must necessarily spend time.

2. "Now the Jewish Passover was near." The Jews wished to have that feast day stained with the Lord's blood. On that feast day the Lamb was slaughtered, who by his blood has consecrated the same day as a feast for us. There was a plan among the Jews for slaughtering Jesus; he who had come from heaven to suffer wished to approach the place of his passion because the hour of the passion was imminent.

(2) "Therefore many from the country went up to Jerusalem before the Passover to purify themselves." The Jews did this according to the instruction of the Lord which had been enjoined in the law through the holy Moses, that all assemble from everywhere on the feast day which was the Passover and be purified by the celebration of that day. 1. But that celebra‐

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1.
Originally the Pascha, the Passover, was an agricultural feast consisting of the slaughtering and eating of a paschal animal, often but not necessarily a lamb, and it was celebrated anywhere. With the cultic reforms of King Josiah (640-609 B.C.) this festival was centralized at the Temple in Jerusalem where all the paschal animals were ritually slaughtered; hence an annual pilgrimage became common. The Feast of Unlevened Bread was originally a separate feast that came to be combined with the Passover Festival at the time of the Exile. The seder meal was offered in private homes on the first night as part of the Passover Festival. See J. Jermias, Jerusalem in the Time of Jesus, 57, 75-77, and 101-03; "Passover," Encyclopedia Judaica (Jerusalem 1971) 13.163-73; G. McRae, "Feast of Passover," NCE 10.1068-70; and C. Pfeiffer, "Passover Lamb," NCE 10.1071.

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Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Fathers of the Church - A New Translation *
  • The Fathers of the Church - A New Translation *
  • Tractates on the Gospel of John 28-54 *
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Select Bibliography ix
  • Tractates 28-54 *
  • Tractate 28 - On John 7.1-13 3
  • Tractate 29 - On John 7.14-18 14
  • Tractate 30 - On John 7.19-24 22
  • Tractate 31 - On John 7.25-36 30
  • Tractate 32 - On John 7.37-39 41
  • Tractate 33 - On John 7.40-53: 8.I-II 51
  • Tractate 34 - On John 8.12 60
  • Tractate 35 - On John 8.13-14 71
  • Tractate 36 - On John 8.15-18 81
  • Tractate 37 - On John 8.19-20 95
  • Tractate 38 - On John 8.21-25 105
  • Tractate 39 - On John 8.25-27 116
  • Tractate 40 - On John 8.28-32 124
  • Tractate 41 - On John 8.31-36 135
  • Tractate 42 - On John 8.37-47 150
  • Tractate 43 - On John 8.48-59 163
  • Tractate 44 - On John 9 175
  • Tractate 45 - On John 10.1-10 187
  • Tractate 46 - On John 10.11-13 203
  • Tractate 47 - On John 10.14-21 212
  • Tractate 48 - On John 10.22-42 228
  • Tractate 49 - On John Ii.I-54 238
  • Tractate 50 - On John 11.55-12.11 260
  • Tractate 51 - On John 12.12-26 271
  • Tractate 52 - On John 12.27-36 280
  • Tractate 53 - On John 12.37-43 290
  • Tractate 54 - On John 12.44-50 301
  • Indices *
  • General Index 311
  • Index of Holy Scripture 321
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