Advances and New Directions

By Silvano Arieti; H. Keith H. Brodie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 32

THE NOSOLOGY
OF PSYCHIATRY

Robert J. Campbell

NOSOLOGY (from nosos, "disease") is the study of diseases from the point of view of their grouping, ordering, and relationship to one another; it includes the classification of diseases as well as the formulation of principles for differentiating one disease from another.

Diagnosis (from dia, "through, dividing into parts," and gnosis, "knowledge, recognition") is the process of distinguishing or recognizing the whole from its manifestations, of detecting the presence of disease from its symptoms. The process of diagnosis affirms that a disease is present; it defines the nature or character of that disease at the greatest level of specificity possible; and it provides a summary statement of what was discovered. Diagnosis is therefore both a process and a statement of the conclusion to which that process leads.

Nomenclature (from nomen, "name," and calare, "to call") is the agreed-upon label or wording that is used to communicate the results of the diagnostic process. Nomenclature is the shorthand name for the disease that has been identified, but in addition it implies that there is some reason for preferring one name to another.

Classification is the grouping of diseases into classes or orders, a logical scheme for organizing and categorizing so that different types of diseases can be distinguished and assigned their proper places.

All four terms—diagnosis, nomenclature, classification, and nosology—refer to various aspects of the conceptualization of disease. Because they are overlapping and interdependent, rather than mutually exclusive, it is not surprising that usage has tended to blur the distinctions between them. In itself, that is of little matter; what is unfortunate is that the vagueness and uncertainty that surround their use have spread as well over the assumptions on which they are based. Often lost sight of is that each of them reflects current speculation and hypotheses about the conditions to which they are applied and not only "hard" knowledge or scientific "fact."

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advances and New Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 856

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.