People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words

By John M. Kistler | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

Many controversial topics are difficult for student researchers to understand fully without examining key people and their positions in the subjects being debated. This series is designed to meet the research needs of high school and college students by providing them with profiles of those who have been at the center of debates on such controversial topics as gun control, capital punishment, and gay and lesbian rights. The personal stories—the reasons behind their arguments—add a human element to the debates not found in other resources focusing on these topics.

Each volume in the series provides profiles of people, chosen for their effective battles in support of or in opposition to one side of a specific controversial issue. The volumes provide an equal number of profiles of those on both sides of the debates. Students are encouraged to read stories from the two opposite sides to develop their critical thinking skills and to draw their own conclusions concerning the specific issues. They will learn about those people who are not afraid to stand up for their cause, no matter what it may be, and no matter what the consequences may be.

To further help the student researcher, the author of each volume has provided an introduction that outlines the history of the issue and the debates surrounding it, as well as explaining the major arguments and concerns of those involved in the debates. The pro and con arguments are clearly defined as are major developments in the movement. Students can use these introductions as a foundation for analyzing the stories of the people who follow.

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People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Carol J. Adams 13
  • Ron Arnold 22
  • David Barbarash 29
  • Don Barnes 36
  • Gene Bauston 41
  • Marc Bekoff 45
  • Brian Bishop 52
  • Robert Cohen 62
  • Priscilla Cohn 72
  • Karen Coyne 78
  • Diana Dawne 87
  • Ryan Demares 92
  • Sherrill Durbin 100
  • Michael Fox 104
  • Milton M.R. Freeman 112
  • Margery Glickman 119
  • Kimber Gorall 126
  • Alan Herscovici 135
  • Alex Hershaft 145
  • J.R. Hyland 152
  • Roberta Kalechofsky 159
  • Crystal Kendell 166
  • Deanna Krantz 172
  • Finn Lynge 182
  • Kathleen Marquardt 187
  • Pat Miller 193
  • Laura Moretti 199
  • Ingrid Newkirk 206
  • Ava Park 212
  • Teresa Platt 219
  • Susan Roghair 226
  • Anthony L. Rose 232
  • Andrew Rowan 237
  • Jerry Schill 244
  • Cindy Schonholtz 253
  • Mary Zeiss Stange 258
  • Patti Strand 265
  • Michael Tobias 269
  • Frankie L. Trull 279
  • William L. Wade 283
  • Ed Walsh 288
  • Ben White 295
  • Bibliography of Contributors’ Writings and Other Resources 319
  • Index 325
  • About the Contributors 337
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