The Great Depression and the New Deal

By Robert F. Himmelberg | Go to book overview

3

America’s Struggle Against the Depression, 1929–1940: From Hoover to Roosevelt and the New Deal

America’s struggle against the Great Depression began with Herbert Hoover, on whose watch the depression began, but reached epic proportions under Franklin Roosevelt and his New Deal. These two men epitomized much of the best of the American political tradition, and both deeply and single-mindedly committed themselves to restoring prosperity and thereby saving the nation from the political extremes that massive unemployment might create.


HOOVER’S “NEW DAY”

Hoover’s efforts failed, and he is to this day held up to contempt as one who could not escape the bounds of the past and offer the inspired, experimental leadership that Roosevelt is credited with giving. This contempt stems from the bitterness many depression-generation Americans felt toward one whose standing and accomplishments promised so much when the nation elected him by a landslide majority in 1928, but whose leadership during the massive economic downturn of 1929–1932 offered such paltry results.

In the decades following the depression, historians portrayed Hoover as a conservative in the tradition of the mainstream politicians who dominated the Republican Party, and national politics, during the 1920s. Hoover did rely, as the conservatives did, on the principles of low taxes, budget control, and minimal government regulation of business, but, unlike Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge, the Republican presidents of the 1920s, whom

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Great Depression and the New Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.