Hank Williams: Snapshots from the Lost Highway

By Colin Escott; Kira Florita | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Almost inevitably, we're going to overlook some of the people who helped us with this book. During the three years between inception and publication, almost everyone involved underwent career or personal changes, so the work was often done at unsociable hours. We owe our biggest vote of thanks to Marty Stuart, Acuff-Rose Music, Hank Williams, Jr., and Jett Williams for opening their archives to us. Without them, of course, the book would not have been feasible. We'd especially like to thank Maria-Elena Orbea at Marty's office, Peggy Lamb and Jerry Bradley at Acuff-Rose, Merle Kilgore and Linda Woodard at Hank Jr's office, and Jett's husband and business partner, Keith Adkinson. Our agent, Amy Williams, took our book around to the few believers in New York. Fortunately, Andrea Schulz at the Da Capo Press division of Perseus Books saw what we saw, and worked unstintingly to make it happen. Thanks also to Jane Snyder and Kevin Hanover at Da Capo. For support and advice, we're grateful to David Gernert of The Gernert Company; Luke Lewis, Chairman of Mercury Nashville and President of Lost Highway Records; Tammy Young at AdJett Productions; and to Peter Guralnick, Ernst Jorgensen, Cal Morgan, Rick Bragg, and designer Steven Cooley.

Among the fans who made materials available to us, we owe a special debt of gratitude to David Mitchell, Bill Whatley, and George Merritt. Additionally, David Dennard, Jurgen Koop, Donald Daily, Glenn Sutton, and Pete Howard gave us previously unpublished images. Former Drifting Cowboy Don Helms, now sadly one of the few surviving members of Hank's bands, helped identify photos, as did Hank's cousin, Walter McNeil, and Red Foley's former steel guitarist, Billy Robinson. And, finally, we'd like to acknowledge the late Dorothy Horstman, who made her Audrey Williams interview available to us.

Thanks also to those around us, especially Pat, Marrah, and Ricky, who heard more about Hank Williams than they ever wanted to know. Now we're back.

Colin Escott and Kira Florita

-11-

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Hank Williams: Snapshots from the Lost Highway
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Hank Williams - Snapshots from the Lost Highway *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments 11
  • Foreword 13
  • Preface 15
  • Introduction 17
  • 1 - I Wish I Had a Dad... 21
  • 2 - The Wap Blues 33
  • 3 - This Ain't No Place for Me 45
  • 4 - The 'Lovesick Blues' Boy: Spring 1948—spring 1949 63
  • 5 - Hilbilly Hits the Jackpot: Nashville, 1949-1951 89
  • 6 - I'm So Tired of It All: January—june 1952 145
  • 7 - Then Came That Fatal Day: June—december 1952 157
  • 8 - The Funeral 175
  • 9 - Aftermath 187
  • Credits 207
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