Ronald Reagan: The Presidential Portfolio : a History Illustrated from the Collection of the Ronald Reagan Library and Museum

By Lou Cannon; Michael Beschloss | Go to book overview

THE RONALD REAGAN
PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

On November 4, 1991, an unprecedented gathering of five presidents—from Richard Nixon to George Bush—attended the dedication of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum. "The doors of this library are open now and all are welcome," declared Ronald Reagan. "The judgment of history is left to you, the people. I have no fears of that. We have done our best. And so I say, 'Come and learn from it.'"

Set on a hilltop in Simi Valley, forty miles northwest of Los Angeles, the 153,000-square‐ foot library, two-thirds of which is underground, is built in a Spanish mission style. It commands a view of the Southern California hills that once served as a backdrop for Hollywood westerns when Reagan was a movie star.

The Library is made up of two distinct parts with separate, but complimentary, missions. The first is the museum with its permanent exhibit galleries and the special or temporary exhibit space. The permanent exhibit tells the story of President Reagan's American journey from childhood through the presidency. The exhibit includes an exact reproduction of the Oval Office, a piece of the Berlin Wall, a decommissioned Tomahawk Missile, interactive displays, gifts from around the world, and many personal items from President and Mrs. Reagan.

The temporary space features two to three exhibits per year that present important issues, themes and events related to President Reagan, the presidency, and/or leadership. These exhibits blend traditional museum experiences using historically significant objects with innovative production techniques and storytelling that create interest and excitement.

The Spirit ofAmerica Series is a recurring theme for many temporary exhibits. As president, Ronald Reagan restored national pride, patriotism, and re-ignited the spirit of America through his deep-seated belief in the American people. To honor that spirit, the Library created a series to celebrate and recognize great Americans—not only individuals, but also companies, events, entertainments, and locations that are uniquely American and represent our nation's distinct character.

The temporary exhibits are included in the museum admission charge. The museum is open every day except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's day. The hours are 10:00 A.M.—5:00 P.M. For museum and exhibit information please call (800) 410-8354.

The second part of the Library is the

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Ronald Reagan: The Presidential Portfolio : a History Illustrated from the Collection of the Ronald Reagan Library and Museum
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ronald Reagan - The Presidential Portfolio *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction *
  • Reagan's Journey *
  • Start the Music *
  • Governor Reagan *
  • A New Beginning *
  • Triumph and Tragedy *
  • Reagan Remembered *
  • The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum *
  • Sources and Acknowledgments *
  • Photo Credits *
  • Index *
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