Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview

is continual ascent in these psalms, it was fitting that what is said to be more outstanding than all else should be set down as the climax after everything else.


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 133

A canticle of steps. Let us observe closely with the heart's eye how the prophet has topped the steps, and mounted to the highest traces of the virtues; for he addresses the rest of his wholesome persuasion to the blessed brotherhood which he had bidden to gather in unity, urging that their blessed harmony be roused to praises of the Lord with the most burning eagerness of love, so that they may attain the crown of their activity, and may in this life imitate the sweetness which we believe will abide in holy minds in that native land of the future. It is right that a blessing be bestowed on Him to whom they have undoubtedly ascended with the greatest zeal. Now we must discuss the power of His commandment, so that its message when understood and analysed can reveal its usefulness to us. The command is: Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and mith thy whole soul, and with thy whole strength, and thy neighbour as thyself. For on these two commandments dependeth the whole law and the prophets. 1 What a marvellous text, expressing under one head all that you can find in the holy Scriptures! For the person who loves God with his whole heart, his whole soul, his whole strength, leaves no place for vices. Where is sin to enter, when one's whole spirit is taken up with God? The devil longs for empty spaces, seeks out unoccupied areas, but when he finds God's presence he retires in great confusion. So if we love God with our whole heart, and entrust ourselves to His power with passionate devotion, we cannot leave room for faults, and we perpetually walk on the most upright ways. When vessels are brimming with some liquid, they cannot take in additional increase; in the same way, if divine love fills us totally, there will be no place of entry for sin. Next comes: And thy neighbour as thyself. We love our neighbour as ourselves when we do harm to no-one, but treat all with the same indulgence as we do ourselves. No person mentally agrees willingly to incur disastrous dangers, or to be hemmed in by guileful traps; all seek for themselves

-337-

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Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ancient Christian Writers - The Works of the Fathers in Translation *
  • Cassiodorus: Explanation of the Psalms *
  • Contents v
  • Commentary on Psalm 101 i
  • Commentary on Psalm 102 18
  • Commentary on Psalm 103 29
  • Commentary on Psalm 104 49
  • Commentary on Psalm 105 65
  • Commentary on Psalm 106 82
  • Commentary on Psalm 107 95
  • Commentary on Psalm 108 102
  • Commentary on Psalm 109 116
  • Commentary on Psalm 110 125
  • Commentary on Psalm III 131
  • Commentary on Psalm 112 137
  • Commentary on Psalm 113 141
  • Commentary on Psalm 114 150
  • Commentary on Psalm 115 155
  • Commentary on Psalm 116 160
  • Commentary on Psalm 117 162
  • Commentary on Psalm 118 174
  • Commentary on Psalm 119 259
  • Commentary on Psalm 120 265
  • Commentary on Psalm 121 270
  • Commentary on Psalm 122 277
  • Commentary on Psalm 123 281
  • Commentary on Psalm 124 287
  • Commentary on Psalm 125 291
  • Commentary on Psalm 126 296
  • Commentary on Psalm 127 301
  • Commentary on Psalm 128 306
  • Commentary on Psalm 129 311
  • Commentary on Psalm 130 316
  • Commentary on Psalm 131 321
  • Commentary on Psalm 132 332
  • Commentary on Psalm 133 337
  • Commentary on Psalm 134 341
  • Commentary on Psalm 135 351
  • Commentary on Psalm 136 359
  • Commentary on Psalm 137 365
  • Commentary on Psalm 138 371
  • Commentary on Psalm 139 386
  • Commentary on Psalm 140 392
  • Commentary on Psalm 141 399
  • Commentary on Psalm 142 406
  • Commentary on Psalm 143 413
  • Commentary on Psalm 144 422
  • Commentary on Psalm 145 432
  • Commentary on Psalm 146 438
  • Commentary on Psalm 147 444
  • Commentary on Psalm 148 449
  • Commentary on Psalm 149 457
  • Commentary on Psalm 150 461
  • Notes 471
  • Indexes 525
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