Global Fortune: The Stumble and Rise of World Capitalism

By Ian Vásquez | Go to book overview

Contributors

J. (Onno) de Beaufort Wijnholds has been an executive director of the International Monetary Fund since 1994. He served as deputy executive director of the De Nederlandsche Bank for seven years and as the alternate executive director of the IMF from 1985 to 1987. Shortly after earning his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Amsterdam in 1977, he served as a member of the National Council on Development Cooperation, which is based in the Netherlands. He is the author of several books and various articles on monetary and financial subjects, including The Need for International Reserves and Credit Facilities and A Framework for Monetary Stability.

Rudiger Dornbusch is the Ford Professor of Economics and International Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Economics. He is associate editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Dornbusch has written articles in various professional journals and is the author or editor of numerous books, including Macroeconomics (with Stanley Fischer); Dollars, Debts and Deficits; The Macroeconomics of Populism in Latin America (edited with Sebastian Edwards); Stabilization, Debt, and Reform: Policy Analysis for Developing Countries; and Keys to Prosperity: Free Markets, Sound Money, and a Bit of Luck. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1971.

Francis J. Gavin is a research fellow at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia and director of the center's Presidency and Macroeconomic Policy Project. Before joining the center, he was an international security fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University and a John M. Olin Postdoctoral Fellow in National Security Affairs at the Center for International Affairs, also at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. and his M.A. in history from the University of

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