Gender, Emotion, and the Family

By Leslie Brody | Go to book overview

4
Physiological Arousal and Patterns
of Emotional Expression

When I get mad, I get all hot and I don't talk to anybody I usually go upstairs and start playing with my toys, because when I do that it calms me down. Sometimes I eat cold stuff like ice cream. I feel mad inside but I don't think about it, and then sometimes I play Barbie dolls and I make the Barbie dolls have a fight and then it makes me forget about it.

—Katie, age 9

We don't always say what we feel, but our bodily processes may change. For example, in anxiety-producing situations, we may sweat more, or involuntarily raise our blood pressures. Lie detector tests are based on the premise that if we are anxious about concealing the truth, our skin conductance will change. Skin conductance is a measure of the ease with which our skin conducts or resists electricity based on how wet it is.

Are there gender differences in the physiology of emotional expressions ? The answer is yes, but with many qualifications. The patterns of gender differences are complex, because arousal shows so much variability from one situation to another as well as from one measure to another, such as heart rate compared to skin conductance. For example, men sometimes show higher skin conductance than women do in the course of conflictual marital interactions, but women sometimes show higher skin conductance than men when watching other people in distressing situations, such as coping with severe illnesses. Sometimes gender differences in physiological responses do not appear; sometimes they appear only in specific contexts and for specific types of responses.

I will focus on gender differences in the most frequently studied physiological responses, including heart rate, blood pressure, endocrine levels,

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gender, Emotion, and the Family
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 359

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.