Ethnicity, Law, and Human Rights: The English Experience

By Sebastian Poulter | Go to book overview

6
Muslims: The Claim to a Separate System
of Personal Law

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

Although it is not entirely clear how far back the Muslim presence in Britain extends, there were certainly some Indian Muslims living in England during the eighteenth century. 1 Most of them were servants and ayahs (maids), brought to this country by army officers and nabobs who had made their fortunes as mercantile agents and clerks in the service of the East India Company. 2 A few others may have worked as entertainers performing at pageants and shows. The Servants' Pocket Book of 1761 specifically refers to various London taverns at which music and dancing took place, as the 'wonted haunts of Moormen [Muslims] and Gentoos [Hindus]'. 3 There were also a number of East Indian seamen, known as Lascars, many of whom were Muslims, who were among London's poor in the 1780s. 4 These sailors had been recruited by the East India Company and been laid off and left to fend for themselves while their ships were docked in English ports. 5 Some remained here permanently. They were ill-treated and despised by the majority community, although eventually a Parliamentary Committee was established to investigate their plight and to recommend improvements in their position. 6

In 1764 a case arose at the Old Bailey in which the key issue was whether or not a Muslim could lawfully undertake to tell the truth in court by swearing an oath on the Qur'an rather than the Bible. 7 A man named Ryan and his wife were on a charge of theft and since this was then a capital offence the two judges trying the case referred the issue about the form of the oath to a bench made up of the twelve most important judges in the land, namely those of the Courts of King's

____________________
1
See Fryer, P., Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain (London, 1984), 27, 31, 69, 77-9.
2
See Visram, R., Ayahs, Lascars and Princes: Indians in Britain 1700-1947 (London, 1986), ch 2.
3
Quoted by Hecht, J., Continental and Colonial Servants in Eighteenth Century England (Massachusetts, 1954), 54.
4
See Visram, ch 3.
5
See Nielsen, J., Muslims in Western Europe (Edinburgh, 1992), 4.
6
Report from the Committee on Lascars, 1814-15 (No. 471).
7
R v Morgan (1764) 1 Leach 54.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnicity, Law, and Human Rights: The English Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.