The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 2

By James Boswell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III. .
1770

Dr. Maxwell's Collectanea -- Johnson's Politics, and general Mode of Life -- Opulent Tradesmen -- London -- Black-letter Books -- "Anatomy of Melancholy." -- Government of Ireland -- Love -- Jacob Behmen -- Established Clergy--Dr. Priestley -- Blank Verse -- French Novels -- Pere Boscovich -- Lord Lyttelton's Dialogues -- Ossian -- Woodhouse, the Poetical Cobbler -- Boetius -- National Debt -- Mallet -- Marriage -- Foppery -- Gilbert -- Cooper -- Homer -- Gregory Sharpe -- Poor of England -- Corn Laws -- Dr. Browne -- Mr. Burke -- Economy -- Fortune-hunters -- Orchards -- Irish Clergy.

DURING this year there was a total cessation of all correspondence between Dr. Johnson and me, without any coldness on either side, but merely from procrastination, continued from day to day; and, as I was not in London, I had no opportunity of enjoying his company and recording his conversation. To supply this blank, I shall present my readers with some Collectanea, obligingly furnished to me by the Rev. Dr. Maxwell,1 of Falkland, in Ireland, some time assistant preacher at the Temple, and for many years the social friend of Johnson, who spoke of him with a very kind regard


Collectanea.

"My acquaintance with that great and venerable character commenced in the year 1754. I was introduced to him by Mr. Grierson,2 his Majesty's printer at Dublin, a gentleman of uncommon learning, and great wit and vivacity. Mr. Grierson died in Germany, at the age of twenty-seven. Dr. Johnson highly respected his abilities, and often observed, that he possessed more extensive knowledge than any man of his years he had ever known. His industry was equal to his talents; and he particularly excelled in every

____________________
1
Dr. William Maxwell was the son of Dr. John Maxwell, Archdeacon of Downe, in Ireland, and cousin of the Honourable Henry Maxwell, Bishop of Dromore in 1765, and of Meath in 1766, from whom he obtained preferment; but having a considerable property of his own, he resigned the living when, as it is said, his residence was insisted on; and he fixed himself in Bath, where he died, so late as 1818, at the age of 87. -- C.
2
Son of the learned Mrs. Grierson, who was patronised by the late Lord Granville, and was the editor of several of the classics. -- B.

-47-

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The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents of Vol. II iii
  • Chapter I - 1769 9
  • Chapter II - 1769-1770 29
  • Chapter III - 1770 47
  • Chapter IV - 1771 60
  • Chapter V - 1772 81
  • Chapter VI - 1772-1773 98
  • Chapter VII - 1773 117
  • Chapter VIII - 1773 144
  • Chapter IX - 1773 168
  • Chapter X 190
  • Chapter XI 203
  • Chapter XII 219
  • Chapter XIII - 1773 236
  • Chapter XIV - 1773 255
  • Chapter XV - 1773 276
  • Chapter XVI - 1773 301
  • Chapter XVII - 1773 323
  • Chapter XVIII - 1773 348
  • Chapter XIX - 1773 376
  • Chapter XX - 1773 396
  • Chapter XXI - 1773 421
  • Chapter XXII - 1773 441
  • Appendix 467
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