Homilies on Leviticus: 1-16

By Gary Wayne Barkley | Go to book overview

HOMILY 1

As "in the Last Days," 1. the Word of God, which was clothed with the flesh of Mary, proceeded into this world. What was seen in him was one thing; what was understood was something else. 2. For the sight of his flesh was open for all to see, but the knowledge of his divinity was given to the few, even the elect. So also when the Word of God was brought to humans through the Prophets and the Lawgiver, 3. it was not brought without proper clothing. For just as there it was covered with the veil of flesh, 4. so here with the veil of the letter, so that indeed the letter is seen as flesh but the spiritual sense hiding within is perceived as divinity. Such, therefore, is what we now find as we go through the book of Leviticus, in which the sacrificial rites, the diversity of offerings, and even the ministries of the priests are described. But perchance the worthy and the unworthy see and hear these things according to the letter, which is, as it were, the flesh of the Word of God and the clothing of its divinity. But "blessed are those eyes" 5. which inwardly see the divine spirit that is concealed in the veil of the letter; and blessed are they who bring clean ears of the inner person to hear these things. Otherwise, they will perceive openly "the letter which kills" 6. in these words.

(2) For if I also should follow the simple understanding, as

____________________
1.
Acts 2.17.
2.
Literally, "the one was what was seen in him; the other what was understood." Origen consistently compares the physical with the spiritual; the earthly with the heavenly; Moses and the Law with Jesus and the Gospels; and the Jewish high priest with Christ the high priest.
3.
I.e., Moses.
4.
2 Cor 3.14. See Robert J. Daly, "Sacrificial Soteriology in Origen's Homilies on Leviticus," SP 17.2 (1982), 872-878.
5.
Luke 10.23.
6.
2 Cor 3.6.

-29-

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Homilies on Leviticus: 1-16
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Origen - Homilies on Leviticus 1-16 *
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Select Bibliography ix
  • Introduction *
  • Homilies 1-16 *
  • Homily 1 29
  • Homily 2 39
  • Homily 3 52
  • Homily 4 70
  • Homily 5 88
  • Homily 6 116
  • Homily 7 129
  • Homily 8 153
  • Homily 9 176
  • Homily 10 202
  • Homily 11 208
  • Homily 12 218
  • Homily 13 232
  • Homily 14 245
  • Homily 15 256
  • Homily 16 261
  • Indices *
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