Communism in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1960

By Edward Taborsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
THE COMMUNIST PARTY AS A WEAPON OF REVOLUTION

"THE DICTATORSHIP of the proletariat is in essence the 'dictatorship' of its vanguard, the 'dictatorship' of its Party as the force which guides the proletariat."1 In strict accord with this fundamental maxim of communist totalitarianism, enunciated by Joseph Stalin himself, the Czechoslovak Communists promptly assumed exclusive control and political leadership the moment they vanquished their democratic opponents in the coup d'état of February 1948. Although purged remnants of all but one of the pre-coup non-communist parties have been allowed to vegetate, their precarious existence does not in any way detract from the full-fledged single-party dictatorship set up by Klement Gottwald and his aides. Since, therefore, the Communist Party is the government of the country, with formal government agencies serving only as obedient executors of Party decisions, it is appropriate to begin this study with an analysis of the KSč the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia.

How well or how badly is the KSč equipped to rule? How does it actually operate as the instrument of proletarian dictatorship? Is it truly the vanguard of the working class? What is the caliber of the Party command and what is its relationship to the rank and file? How strong are the Party's ideology and moral fiber? How has it weathered the shock to which it has been exposed in the post- Stalin era? What are the major strains and problems plaguing it, and what are its main sources of strength and weakness? These are some of the questions which will be considered in the first chapters. But before this task is begun, a brief review will be made of the origins of the Party and the highlights of its developments prior to February 1948.


ORIGINS AND APPRENTICESHIP: 1921-19382

"The foundation of the KSč [in 1921] put at the head of the working class a Party which adhered proudly to Marxism-Leninism,

____________________
1
Joseph Stalin, Problems of Leninism, Moscow, 1940, p. 135.
2
For the history of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia prior to February 1948, see Přehled dějin komunistické strany československa (An Outline of the

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communism in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.