Communism in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1960

By Edward Taborsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
SOCIALIST LEGALITY

"WHAT IS the state but a great robber band if it be lacking in justice?" When studying the communist system of justice, one cannot help thinking of this celebrated sentence of St. Augustine, written fifteen centuries before anyone had ever heard of Lenin and his "Revolutionary legality." Indeed, no story is sadder for anyone reared in the legal and judicial concepts of Western civilization than the progressive decay of these concepts in Czechoslovakia, a country that used to be justly proud of its rule of law and judicial integrity. It took the communist rulers of Czechoslovakia only a few years to tear down the elaborate palace of pre-communist justice and erect on its site a new structure dedicated to class warfare.

"Our people's courts stand in the first line of the struggle for socialism . . . educate citizens to respect socialist property . . . tighten the working and state discipline . . .," wrote the Czechoslovak Minister of Justice, Štefan Rais, in February 1953.1 His successor, Jan Bartuška, spoke in the same vein in May 1955: "Our people's democratic laws . . . are directed against those who disturb the foundations and the development of socialist construction of our fatherland and the rules of socialist life of our people. . . . Not only does our judiciary strictly and uncompromisingly punish all criminals, agents of imperialism, traitors and enemies of our people's democratic system, but it also provides for the education of these culprits and gives all those who have gone astray the opportunity of rejoining the building work after they have served their sentences. . . ."2 Three years later, yet another Minister of Justice, Václav Škoda, urged the courts to make "better use of their functions of suppression and education" and to strengthen "the socialist consciousness of the citizens"; and he reminded them that, together with the organs of public prosecution--the Army and Security forces-- they were responsible "for the liquidation of hostile elements."3

____________________
1
Rudé právo, February 2, 1953.
2
ibid., May 11, 1955.
3
ibid., July 24, 1958.

-268-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communism in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.