A Companion to the Victorian Novel

By William Baker; Kenneth Womack | Go to book overview

center have been determined by acts of violence and conquest at the “far-off” margins. Perhaps James’s position as a postcolonial American gave him the insight that the far-reaching power networks of the British empire provided the enabling material and discursive conditions for his stories of individual consciousness and personal relationship. And it is to the “question of an Impe-rium”—a total system of meanings and relations connecting metropolis and colony, the arts of peace and the arts of war, the emotions of individuals and the power of the state—that postcolonial criticism of the Victorian novel must also attend.


WORKS CITED AND SELECTED WORKS FOR FURTHER READING

Achebe, Chinua. “An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness.” In Hopes and Impediments: Selected Essays, 1965–1987, pp. 1–13. London: Heinemann, 1988.

Azim, Firdous. The Colonial Rise of the Novel. London: Routledge, 1993.

Braddon, Mary Elizabeth. Lady Audley’s Secret. 1862. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1987.

Brantlinger, Patrick. Rule of Darkness: British Literature and Imperialism, 1830–1914. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1988.

Bratton, J. S. The Impact of Victorian Children’s Fiction. London: Croom Helm, 1981.

Bristow, Joseph. Empire Boys: Adventures in a Man’s World. London: HarperCollins, 1991.

Brontë, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. 1847. London: Penguin, 1985.

Chrisman, Laura. “The Imperial Unconscious? Representations of Imperial Discourse.” Critical Quarterly 32 (1990): 38–58.

Collins, Wilkie. The Moonstone. 1868. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1982.

Dixon, Robert. Writing the Colonial Adventure: Race, Gender and Nation in An-glo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875–1914. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995.

Edmond, Rod. Representing the South Pacific: Colonial Discourse from Cook to Gauguin. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1997.

Eliot, T. S. “Kipling Redivivus.” Athenaeum, 9 May 1919, 297–298.

GoGwilt, Christopher. The Invention of the West: Joseph Conrad and the Dou-ble-Mapping of Europe and Empire. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1995.

Green, Martin. Dreams of Adventure, Deeds of Empire. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1980.

Green, Roger Lancelyn, ed. Kipling: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1971.

Gwynn, Stephen. “Mr. Robert Louis Stevenson: A Critical Study.” Fortnightly Review 56 (1894): 776–792.

Haggard, H. Rider. King Solomon’s Mines. 1885. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1989.

James, Henry. The Golden Bowl. 1904. London: Penguin, 1985.

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