A Companion to the Victorian Novel

By William Baker; Kenneth Womack | Go to book overview

more than 170 books published on the topic since 1975. Although we now commonly acknowledge a nineteenth-century literary tradition characterized by such concerns, we have almost completely overlooked the efforts of Oliphant, Jameson, Kavanagh, and their kind in conceptualizing it. For despite what we might consider their antifeminist stance on particular issues, these critics pioneered the enterprise of feminist criticism as we know it today, discerning among their contemporaries a common preoccupation with what it meant to be classified as a woman in Victorian culture—and still, to a surprising extent, in ours.


WORKS CITED AND SELECTED WORKS FOR FURTHER READING

Casey, Ellen Miller. “Edging Women Out?: Reviews of Women Novelists in the Athenaeum, 1860–1900.” Victorian Studies (Winter 1996): 151–171.

Cixous, Hélène. “The Laugh of the Medusa.” In New French Feminisms: An Anthology, pp. 245–263. Ed. Elaine Marks and Isabelle de Courtivron. New York: Schocken, 1980.

Easley, Alexis. “Gendered Observations: Harriet Martineau and the Woman Question.” In Victorian Woman Writers and the Woman Question, pp. 80–98. Ed. Nicola Diane Thompson. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999.

Eliot, George. “German Wit: Heinrich Heine.” In Essays and Leaves from a Notebook, pp. 64–114. New York: Harper, 1884.

———. Middlemarch. 1872. New York: Norton, 1977.

———. The Mill on the Floss. 1860. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1980.

———. “The Natural History of German Life: Riehl.” In Essays and Leaves from a Notebook, pp. 170–225. New York: Harper, 1884.

———. “Silly Novels by Lady Novelists.” In Essays of George Eliot, pp. 300–324. Ed. Thomas Pinney. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1963.

———. “Woman in France.” In Essays of George Eliot, pp. 52–81. Ed. Thomas Pinney . London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1963.

Ferris, Ina. “From Trope to Code: The Novel and the Rhetoric of Gender in Nineteenth-Century Critical Discourse.” In Rewriting the Victorians: Theory, History, and the Politics of Gender, pp. 18–30. Ed. Linda M. Shires. New York: Routledge, 1992.

Fulmer, Constance M. “Edith Simcox: Feminist Critic and Reformer.” Victorian Periodicals Review 31.1 (Spring 1998): 105–221.

Gilbert, Sandra M., and Susan Gubar. The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Imagination. New Haven: Yale UP, 1979.

Gillooly, Eileen. Smile of Discontent: Humor, Gender, and Nineteenth-Century British Fiction. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1999.

Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman. Trans. Gillian C. Gill. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1985.

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