Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South

By Susanna Delfino; Michele Gillespie | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Samuel Cole Williams, The Memoirs of Lieut. Henry Timberlake, 1756–1765 (1765; reprint, Marietta, Ga.: Continental Book Co., 1948), 92.
2
William C. McDowell Jr., ed. Colonial Records of South Carolina: Journals of the Commissioners of the Indian Trade, September 20, 1710—August 29, 1718 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1955), 16 and 24 November 1716; Raymond Demere to William Henry Lyttleton, 13 October 1756, in McDowell, Colonial Records of South Carolina: Documents Relating to Indian Affairs, 1754–1765 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1970).
3
Samuel Cole Williams, ed. Adair's History of the American Indians (1775; reprint, New York: Promontory Press, 1930), 454.
4
McDowell, Colonial Records of S.C.: Journals, 23 November 1716, 23 January and 5 February 1717; Sarah H. Hill, Weaving New Worlds: Southeastern Cherokee Women and Their Basketry (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997), 336 n. 48; Paul Demere to Lyttleton, 2 May 1759, in McDowell, Colonial Records of S.C.: Documents; Williams, Adair's History, 454.
5
Kentucky gained independence from Virginia and was admitted to statehood in 1792. Tennessee became a state in 1796, when its population exceeded 60,000 (D. W. Meinig, The Shaping of America [New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986], 348–49, 351).
6
William G. McLoughlin and Walter H. Conser, “The Cherokees in Transition: A Statistical Analysis of the Federal Cherokee Census of 1838,” Journal of American History 64, no. 3 (December 1977), 681, 693–94. The Cherokee census of 1825 enumerated 13,583 Cherokees, 147 white men married to Cherokees, 73 white women married to Cherokees, 1,277 African slaves, and 400 North Carolina Cherokees “not included in the census and who have since merged among us” (John Ridge to Albert Gallatin, 27 February 1826, John Howard Payne MSS, 9:103, Ayer Collection, Newberry Library, Chicago (hereafter AC).
7
See Theda Perdue, Slavery and the Evolution of Cherokee Society, 1540–1866 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1979), 50–69, and “Cherokee Planters: The Development of Plantation Slavery before Removal,” in The Cherokee Indian Nation: A Troubled History, ed. Duane King (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1979), 110–28; and William G. McLoughlin and Walter H. Conser, “The Cherokee Censuses of 1808, 1825, and 1835,” in The Cherokee Ghost Dance, by William G. McLoughlin (Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 1984), 215–50. With the establishment of a national and centralized government, the Cherokee nation became officially known as the Cherokee Nation.

-50-

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