Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South

By Susanna Delfino; Michele Gillespie | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
“Délibérations du Conseil,” Ursuline Convent of New Orleans Archives, New Orleans, La. (hereafter UCNOA), 81; Ursulines to Augustin Grivony, sale of a slave, 11 April 1798, Acts of Francisco Broutin, vol. 47, Notarial Archives of New Orleans (hereafter NANO), 321; “Libro primero de matrimonios de negros y mulatos de la parroquia de sn. Luis de la Nueva Orleans; en 137 folios. Da principio en 20 de enero de 1777 y acaba en 1830” (hereafter SLC–M3), Archives of the Archdiocese of New Orleans (hereafter AANO), 42 bis.
2
The Ursuline order comprised two ranks of nuns. Choir nuns, so-called because of the requirement that they sing daily office in chapel, were born of aristocratic or bourgeois families, brought dowries with them upon entering the convent, took solemn, perpetual vows, and performed the educational work for which the Ursulines were known. Converse nuns were drawn from farming, artisanal, and laboring backgrounds. They provided no dowries, took simple vows, and served the convent as housekeepers, nurses, gardeners, and messengers.
3
The historiography on which these summary sentences is based is vast, and the following citations are merely representative. On the sexual exploitation of bondwomen see Frances S. Foster, “Ultimate Victims: Black Women in Slave Narratives,” Journal of American Culture 1, no. 4 (1978): 845–53; and Deborah Gray White, Ar'n't I a Woman: Female Slaves in the Plantation South (New York: W. W. Norton, 1985).

On the “separate spheres” paradigm and the cult of domesticity see Barbara Welter,

-214-

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