Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South

By Susanna Delfino; Michele Gillespie | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Monitor (Tuscaloosa), 25 February 1846, cited in Richard W. Griffin, “Poor White Laborers in Southern Cotton Factories, 1789–1865,” The South Carolina Historical Magazine 61, no. 1 (January 1940): 36. On the myth of the southern lady see the now classic book by Anne Firor Scott, The Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1830–1930 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1970).
2
J. S. Buckingham, The Slave States of America, vol. 2 (London: Fisher, Son and Co., 1842), 111–14.
3
James L. Skinner III, ed., The Autobiography of Henry Merrell: Industrial Missionary to the South (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1991), 406.
4
Although Bess Beatty does not make this point explicitly in her essay in this volume, her review essay on the influence of women's history on the subject of gender and the southern textile industry does. All the secondary sources she cites in the review essay, however, deal exclusively with the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. See Bess Beatty, “Gender Relations in Southern Textiles: A Historiographical Overview,” in Race, Class, and Community in Southern Labor History, ed. Gary M. Fink and Merl E. Reed (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1994), 9–16.
5
Victoria E. Bynum, Unruly Women: The Politics of Social and Sexual Control in the Old South (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992); LeeAnn Whites, The Civil War as a Crisis in Gender: Augusta, Georgia, 1860–1890 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995).
6
For a wonderful descriptive examination of women's work in the South see Julia Cherry Spruill, Women's Life and Work in the Southern Colonies (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1938). The classic account of women's work in early modern Europe remains Joan Scott and Louise Tilley, Women, Work, and Family (New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1978).
7
Jacqueline Jones, Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work, and the Family from Slavery to the Present (N.Y.: Basic Books, 1985); Deborah Gray White, Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South (New York: W. W. Norton, 1985); Betty Wood, Women's Work, Men's Work: The Informal Slave Economies of Lowcountry Georgia, 1750–1830 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995).

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