United States Policy towards Indonesia in the Truman and Eisenhower Years

By Andrew Roadnight | Go to book overview

Preface

Richard Nixon highlighted the major factor driving US policy towards Indonesia when, in 1967, he noted that ‘with its 100 million people and its 3,000 mile arc of islands containing the region's richest hoard of natural resources, Indonesia constitutes the greatest prize in the Southeast Asia area’. 1 His assessment came after the Indonesian military had, in 1965, suppressed the Indonesian communist party, the PKI, and carried out a massacre of alleged communists, which had left hundreds of thousands of people dead, and had removed President Sukarno from power. In November 1967, Western business leaders met the new Indonesian leadership in Geneva to divide up the spoils of victory – the economic assets Nixon spoke of – and begin the exploitation of the country's wealth, which Sukarno had resisted. 2

Indonesia's value to the West has, though, always gone beyond its economic significance. As the world's largest Islamic country and fifth most populous nation, it was arguably the most important country in Southeast Asia. Nevertheless, assessments of Indonesia's importance invariably reflected its position in the priorities of Western governments rather than its own intrinsic worth. Thus, to The Netherlands, it was the major imperial asset which brought wealth and status as a world power to an otherwise small European nation. For the Australians, Indonesia represented not just a physical barrier to invasion from the north but also, with its huge population and geographical proximity, a potential threat. With its western extremity close to Singapore and stretching to New Guinea in the east, Indonesia's wider strategic importance derived from its control of the lines of communication vital to the British Empire and the West's military and trading operations.

This book examines how successive postwar US administrations developed and executed policy towards Indonesia. It will assess the way in which Washington faced the challenge of Third World nationalism in an economically and strategically important country and, after acting as midwife to the Republic of Indonesia, managed the post-independence relationship. Of crucial interest is why, during this period, American policy towards Indonesia swung from non-intervention, at the end of World War II, to a position where, thirteen years later, Washington provided political and material support for a rebellion against the

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
United States Policy towards Indonesia in the Truman and Eisenhower Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.