United States Policy towards Indonesia in the Truman and Eisenhower Years

By Andrew Roadnight | Go to book overview

7
Picking up the Pieces (June 1958 – January 1961)

The collapse of the secret campaign against Sukarno left the Administration in an extremely weak position as it tried to try to repair the damage done by its failed intervention in the rebellion. However, Washington's chances of building a better relationship with Jakarta were also hindered by its unwillingness to adopt policies designed to show a renewed commitment to Indonesia. Instead, it continued to give preference to the views of its Anglo-Saxon allies, which limited its ability to project a positive impression to the Indonesian Government and hamstrung its attempts to prevent further intrusion by the Soviets. Secretary of State Dulles was reluctant to accept the need for a rapprochement with the Indonesian Government. Nonetheless, on 20 May 1958, he expressed publicly the Administration's new-found belief that the differences between the government and the rebels were an internal matter which ‘should be dealt with . . . without intrusion from without’. Dulles' statement was part of the price demanded by Djuanda to demonstrate American goodwill before he and Nasution began to fulfil their part of the deal, which included a Cabinet reshuffle and action against the Perserikaten Komunis Indonesia (PKI). On 22 May, Washington made good on its promised confidence-building measures, which included the rice sale, some small arms for the police and $1.2 million worth of aircraft spares for the national airline, the police and the air force. 1 Dulles also held out the prospect that Washington would be prepared to extend ‘substantial economic aid and . . . military aid’ after the Indonesians had shown their determination to eliminate ‘the communist threat’. 2

-164-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
United States Policy towards Indonesia in the Truman and Eisenhower Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.