APPENDIX

p. 17 Rejoicing in the fields, in the blessing of their new labour, ancestral father delved, ancestral mother milked, thus nourishing the destiny of a whole people.

p. 22 It was at the worst crossroads of my journey. . . On this side the districts which I avoided, so great was my disgust of everything which was praised and practised there. I mocked at their gods, they at mine. Where is your poet, poor and boastful people? There is none here.

p. 34 Ill-pleased she senses the pride of the things which have sprung up merely to bloom.

p. 35 I wanted it to be of cool iron and like a smooth, firm fillet; but in all the seams of the mine there was no metal ready to be cast.

Now therefore it shall be thus: like a great exotic flower-head, formed of fire-red gold and rich, flashing precious stones.

p. 37 Where no will functions except his own; and where he dictates to the light and the weather.

p. 37 My garden needs neither air nor warmth, the garden which I cultivated for myself; and the lifeless flocks of its birds have never beheld a springtime.

p. 42 Yonder on the shore a brother beckons, waving his joyous banner.

p. 43 Let us wander round the motionless pond into which the waterways flow. You seek serenely to comprehend me. A wind blows round us, soft as spring.

The leaves which lie yellow upon the ground scatter a new perfume: in wise words you repeat what has gladdened me in the pictured book.

But have you knowledge also of profound happiness, have you understanding of the silent tear? Shading your eye you stand on the bridge watching the flight of the swans.

p. 43 The flower which I foster at the window protected from frost by the grey pot has long distressed me in spite of the care I take of it, and hangs its head as if it were slowly dying.

In order to remove from my mind the memory of its former blossoming I choose a sharp implement and cut off the pale flower with its sick heart.

-59-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • I 11
  • II 18
  • III 20
  • IV 26
  • V 31
  • VI 45
  • VII 56
  • Appendix 59
  • Biographical Dates 62
  • Select Bibliography 63
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