Global America? The Cultural Consequences of Globalization

By Ulrich Beck; Natan Sznaider et al. | Go to book overview

References

Albert, M. (1993), Capitalism against Capitalism. London: Whurr.

Ambrose, S.E. (1983), Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy since 1938. Harmondsworth: Pelican, 3rd rev. edn.

Andréani, G. (1999–2000), ‘The Disarray of US Non-proliferation Policy’, Survival 41(4): 42–61.

Appleby, Joyce (1992), ‘Recovering America's Historic Diversity: Beyond Exceptionalism’, Journal of American History 79: 419–31.

Baran, P. (1973), The Political Economy of Growth. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Bauer, R.A. (ed.) (1975), The United States in World Affairs: Leadership, Partnership, or Disengagement? Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia.

Bello, W., S. Cunningham and Li Kheng Po (1998), A Siamese Tragedy: Development and Disintegration in Modern Thailand. London and Bangkok: Zed Books and Focus on the Global South.

Brzezinski, Z. (1970), Between Two Ages: America's Role in the Technetronic Era. Harmondsworth, Penguin.

Campbell, D. (2000), ‘Drugs in the Firing Line’, Guardian Weekly (27 July–2 August).

Croose Parry, Renee-Marie (2000), ‘Our World on the Threshold of the New Millennium’, WFSF Futures Bulletin 26(1): 12–15.

Davis, Mike (1986), Prisoners of the American Dream. London: Verso.

Diamond, Jared (1999), Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. New York: Norton.

Drinnon, R. (1980), Facing West: The Metaphysics of Indian-hating and Empire-building. New York: New American Library.

Duclos, D. (1998), The Werewolf Complex: America's Fascination with Violence. Oxford: Berg.

Dyer, Joel (1999), The Perpetual Prisoner Machine: How America Profits From Crime. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Egan, T. (1999), ‘Hard Time: Less Crime, More Criminals, New York Times (7 March).

Evans, Harold (1998), The American Century. London: Jonathan Cape.

Frank, R.H., and P.J. Cook (1995), The Winner-Take-All Society. New York: Free Press.

Frederickson, Kari (2001), The Dixiecrat Revolt and the End of the Solid South, 19321968. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.

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