A Guide to the Contemporary Commonwealth

By W. David McIntyre | Go to book overview

18
Outgrowing the Commonwealth –
The Case of Cabi

The oldest and largest of the inter-governmental organisations was not listed, for the first time, along with the other leading IGOs, in the 1998 Commonwealth Yearbook. It appeared, but only within a list of some 130 organisations under the heading ‘Commonwealth Network’. This list included IGOs, regional organisations, and certain international organisations that had their roots in the Commonwealth, but had later spread their wings more widely, like Sight-Savers International and the World Scout Movement.

The Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, began as a group of four research institutes and ten ‘clearing houses’ for research information covering the whole field of agricultural, veterinary, forestry and food production sciences. It changed its name in 1986 to CAB-International, later to CABI, pronounced ‘Cabi’. It became a new type of international, not-for-profit inter-governmental organisation, open to all countries, based on treaty-level agreements with governments and self-financing from charges for its publications and services. This transition well illustrates the growing globalisation of many areas once handled ‘in family’ and also the restructuring brought on by the user pays, free market philosophy of the 1990s. However, the creation and growth of Cabi is instructive of how services could evolve from colonial mechanisms to provide some of those continuing benefits which enabled the Commonwealth to survive the crises of decolonisation.

The origins of Cabi went back to before the First World War. To coordinate research into West African insects ‘helpful and inimical to man’, the Colonial Office set up a research committee in 1910 with half the cost met by the British government and half by its West African colonial governments. The committee’s scope was extended to all colonies by the 1911 Imperial Conference and in 1913 the Imperial

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Guide to the Contemporary Commonwealth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.