Television and the American Family

By Jennings Bryant | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Television's Effects on Families' Use of Time

John P. Robinson
University of Maryland, College Park

As television in America enters its fifth decade, there are still many aspects of its influence about which little has been documented. One of them is the effect television has had on the everyday lives of families and of people who live in families. That is largely because the most widely available audience measurements deal far more with program popularity or with individuals as potential consumers of products than with how television is affecting the rest of their lives.

In the absence of appropriate data on audience behavior, television has been accused of having deleterious effects in many areas of daily life. These include emphasizing or justifying violence as a solution to daily problems, decreasing children's school performance, discouraging discourse, promoting superficial personality styles, trivializing values, fostering consumerism, and glorifying materialism, among many others. Most of these effects, of course, have a direct bearing on the nature and quality of family life.

There are, however, a few studies that have examined these larger roles of television as it relates to the full round of other daily activities. Most of this research has been directed at individuals who are members of families, rather than specifically at families as interactive and functioning units of analysis. However, these studies do address television's role in affecting the nature and structure of all the other activities in which each family member engages. More specifically, data gathered from individuals in families also allows one to examine how being a member of a family unit affects one's daily life.

As we see here, however, it is not at all clear that television's pervasive role in affecting the activity patterns and lives of members of family units is that much different from that for members of nonfamily units. To be sure, how one family member chooses to spend time does affect how other members

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Television and the American Family
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 385

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.