Architecture in Sweden, a Survey of Swedish Architecture throughout the Ages and up to the Present Day

By August Hahr; J. S. Herrstreom | Go to book overview

VII.
THE SO-CALLED PERIOD OF LIBERTY AND THE REACTION.

The new epoch which followed the final disappointments of the great war, Karl XIIth's death ( 1718) from a hostile bullet and a lost position of power was not characterized by noble palaces or by greater monumental buildings of any kind. It was not until the approach of the close of the century that attempts were made in this direction. One was occupied with more practical aims. The so-called Period of Liberty with its almost republican constitution and its power invested in the Riksdag, with its two parties the "hats" (bellicose) and the "caps" (peace-loving), was largely the epoch of civic utility, in other words, the commoner's "period of greatness". It was characterized by mercantile and industrial interests. It laid the foundations of commercial intercourse and formed trading companies, for instance, the East India Company; many new iron-works and other industrial enterprises were set-going and agriculture and the arts and crafts were encouraged. The general improvement had a beneficial effect on architecture which took upon itself new expressions corresponding to the signs of the times. Already at the beginning of the epoch the building of the Stockholm Palace was resumed in accordance with parliamentary enaction. This event, which certainly savoured of no civil democratic measure, was of immense importance in the development of art in our land. A special "deputation" was elected to take charge of the responsible commission. From France were once more summoned artists and artisans. In the new styles of the times, "stile regence" and the Rococo, the sculptural and painting decoration of the interior was executed accordingly as the various parts were finished. The work began in 1732, and the leader was Count Karl Gustav Tessin, son of the great Tessin, a highly accomplished "connoisseur" who very soon, however, went over to diplomacy and politics. He was followed by Baron Karl Hårleman ( 1700-1753) the foremost architect of the earlier part of the "Period of Liberty". Under his successor, Count Karl Johan Cronstedt ( 1709-1779), of lesser distinction, the palace is thus far complete as to enable the Royal Family to move in ( 1754). In 1735, the Royal Drawing Academy (Kungliga Ritarakademien), the origin of the Royal Academy of Arts, was founded by the French painter G. B. Taraval, the sculptor Bouchardon and others, under the leadership of Hårleman, and thus the palace enterprize became a seat and seminary for the training of Swedish architects and artists. Of

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Architecture in Sweden, a Survey of Swedish Architecture throughout the Ages and up to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface. 3
  • I- Simpler Dwelling-Houses in Town and Country In Olden Times. 5
  • III- Medieval Castles. 20
  • IV- Wasa Castles. 22
  • IV- Wasa Castles. 30
  • VII- The So-Called Period of Liberty and the Reaction. 49
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 53
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 57
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 64
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 70
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 80
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 96
  • VIII- The Days of Gustav Iii. 112
  • List of Illustrations 127
  • Contents 129
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