High Tor, a Play in Three Acts

By Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

ACT ONE

SCENE II

SCENE: The curtain goes up on complete darkness enfolding the summit of the Tor. There is a long cumbrous rolling, as of a ball going down a bowling alley, a flash of white light, a crackling as of falling pins and a mutter dying into echo along the hills. The flash reveals the outline of the Tor, black against the sky, and on it the figures of the DUTCH CREW. Again the roll, the flash, the break and the dying away. The beam of the airplane beacon steals into the scene sufficiently to suggest the bowlers, some of them standing, some sitting about the keg, the CAPTAIN'S WIFE a little apart from the rest. Beyond the peak is a moving floor, the upper side of blown cloud.

The Captain's Wife. I'm weary of it, Martin! When you drink
there should be one on guard to watch the river lest the ship come, and pass, and we must haunt the dark another year!

The Captain. To humor her,
Pieter, old son, climb down and post the Zee,
and mind you keep good lookout.

Pieter. Ships, aye, ships--
when the ball's rolling and there's gin in hand
I go to post. My luck!

The Captain. When you shipped with me
you signed the voyage.

Pieter. Is this sea or land?
I'm no foot soldier!

The Captain. March!

-27-

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High Tor, a Play in Three Acts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Act One 1
  • Scene I 3
  • Act One 27
  • Scene III 36
  • Act Two 71
  • Scene I 73
  • Scene II 99
  • Act Three 115
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