High Tor, a Play in Three Acts

By Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

ACT TWO

SCENE I

SCENE: The Tor and the steam shovel as before, only five or six hours later. It's still pitch dark, and BIGGS and SKIMMERHORN are still in the shovel. They are, however, fast asleep in much the same postures they took formerly on the ground. Under the shovel sits DEWITT, picking up and smoothing on his knee a few bills which he has found blowing loose on the rock. The beacon light flashes into the scene.

DeWitt. There comes on the light again, too, the sweeping light that withers a body's entrails. No sooner out than lit again.--

[Two snores rise from the sleeping pair.]

Aye, take your ease and rest, you detachable Doppelgangers, swollen with lies, protected by the fiends, impervious to lightning, shedding rain like ducks--and why wouldn't you shed rain? your complexions being pure grease and your insides blubber? You can sleep, you can rest. You of the two-bottoms. You make nothing of the lightning playing up and down your backbones, or turning in on cold iron, but a poor sailor out of Holland, what rest has he?--

[He smooths a bill.]

These will be tokens and signs, these will, useful in magic, potent to ward off evil or put a curse on your enemies. Devil's work or not, I shall carry them on me, and make myself a match for these fulminating latter- day spirits.

[He pouches the bills.]

-73-

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High Tor, a Play in Three Acts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Act One 1
  • Scene I 3
  • Act One 27
  • Scene III 36
  • Act Two 71
  • Scene I 73
  • Scene II 99
  • Act Three 115
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