Newfoundland; Economic, Diplomatic, and Strategic Studies

By R. A. MacKay | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Dear Sir Campbell,

It is now over four years since the Supervisory Committee on Newfoundland Studies was organized and I was commissioned to direct and edit the studies which are here brought to completion.

In the light of the tumultuous years which have intervened, it was surely a venture in faith to have decided then to take time out from the desperate business of war to examine a hitherto neglected corner of the British Commonwealth of Nations. The peoples of the British Commonwealth then stood alone in the West against the aggressor; although material aid was forthcoming from the United States in increasing volume, the Atlantic life-line was stretched dangerously thin; the Mediterranean route was blocked and the enemy was advancing overland on Suez; in the East the Russian armies were in stubborn retreat; in the Pacific, as we then feared, Japan was poised to strike. Yet we believed not only in the triumph of our arms and the survival of the British Commonwealth of Nations, but, as well, in the reestablishment of a world order in which reason would again become important in the guidance of human affairs. We, therefore, thought it worthwhile to do an objective study on Newfoundland's problems not merely out of academic interest but in the hope that it would be of assistance to the people of Newfoundland when, as had been promised by Parliament, they would have the opportunity of expressing their opinions as to the future constitutional status of their beloved country.

We agreed, you will recall, that Newfoundland's basic problems were economic and that, accordingly, a detailed description and analysis of Newfoundland's economy was essential. This task was entrusted to Dr. S. A. Saunders who had done special work on the economy of the Maritime

-vii-

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