Newfoundland; Economic, Diplomatic, and Strategic Studies

By R. A. MacKay | Go to book overview

V
THE LOBSTER CONTROVERSY

THE comparative quiet that followed the ratification of the Bait Act was only the calm before a greater storm which soon arose as a result of the development of the lobster industry. This new industry had originated at Bay of Islands in 1858 and had been extended to St. Barbe in 1873. At first, the canning of lobsters was in practice a British (i.e. Newfoundland or Canadian) monopoly, and, although progress was slow until 1880, by 1887 no less than twelve British lobster factories had been established on the west coast between St. George's Bay and St. Barbe. Three quarters of them were owned by Nova Scotians or Prince Edward Islanders, but nearly one thousand Newfoundlanders were employed in the industry.1 French competition began in 1883 when a St. Malo firm in defiance of treaty obligations erected two lobster factories at Port-au-Choix and St. John Island.

Prior to 1887 no question of treaty rights in the matter was raised by either side, but in that year the French claimed that the establishment of factories and the prosecution of the lobster fisheries by the British involved an interference with their cod-fishery and must, therefore, be stopped. This was apparently only a pretext as the French cod-fishery on the Treaty Shore had already declined to negligible dimensions. The real motive was apparently to exact reprisals for the Bait Act of 1887--it is significant that, after tacitly acquiescing in the expansion of the British lobster industry along the coast during a generation, the French should suddenly claim that it was illegal in the very year that the Bait Act was ratified.

____________________
1
Rogers, Historical Geography of Neufoundland, pp. 221-2.

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Newfoundland; Economic, Diplomatic, and Strategic Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 577

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.