The Struggle for the Pacific

By Gregory Bienstock | Go to book overview

NOTES TO CHAPTER III
1.
Alfred Caillaux Fabre-Luce, Paris, 1933.
2.
V. Batrak, "Tjashelaja promyschlennostj Japoniji" (Russ.: "The Japanese Heavy Industries") in the Russian military review, Voina i Revolutsija, December 1934, p. 107: Tokio's arsenals during the World War employed 30,000 hands.
3.
Batrak, l.c., p. 103; cf. J. E. Orchard, Japan's Economic Position, New York, 1930, p. 267.
4.
Armaments Year Book, 1934 ( League of Nations), p. 844.
5.
The material on the plans for the economic mobilization of Japan is taken from the collection Japonia ( "Partisdat", Leningrad, 1934), pp. 235-6. A special chapter (pp. 231-320) describes in detail "the military resources of Japanese imperialism." The difficulties of accurate estimate are obvious. What is said by Japanese and Russians alike on their own state of preparedness would, if taken literally, probably lead to serious under-estimation. On the other hand, what each says of the other is so clearly exaggerated that the figures have to be used with great caution.
6
The figures are taken from the latest ( 1935-6) Statistical Year- Book of the League of Nations. These figures do not tally with those in other books of reference--the reader may be referred to these, e.g. U.S.S.R. Handbook ( London 1936), Statesman's Year Book ( London 1936), Japan-Manchukuo Year Book ( Tokyo 1936), and the last editions of the Statistisches Jahrbuch für das Deutsche Reich ( Berlin). What matters here, however, is the comparison not the accuracy to a ton or two of the estimates.
7.
The two coalfields in Manchuria, which supply coal suitable for coking, are situated in the neighbourhood of the Russian frontier, in the lower Sungari valley (Hegan), and in the Mishany district, in the valley of the Mulin-he river. If war breaks out both are exposed to cavalry raids. Batrak, l.c., p. 103.
8.
Orchard, l.c., p. 294.
9.
Cf. Edwin L. James, "Oil is the Weak Point in Tokyo's Strategy," in The New York Times, February 3, 1935.
10.
Batrak, l.c., p. 100.
11.
Batrak, l.c., p. 104.
12.
Orchard, l.c., p. 282.
13.
Batrak, l.c., p. 102.
14.
A group of Japanese business men contracted in 1928 to deliver to Japan (shipping from Yampi Sound on Timor Sea, West Kimberley, West Australia) large quantities of iron ore (10,000,000 tons within 12 years) ( Far Eastern Review, November 1928). The Japanese are anxious to secure all available supplies of iron ore in the Southern Pacific. The main source, however, is in the Malay States, where the Japanese possess concessions in Johore and some other States.

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Struggle for the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Preface 9
  • Contents 13
  • List of Maps 15
  • Chapter I The Pacific World In The Making 17
  • Notes to Chapter I 95
  • Chapter II Rivalries in the Pacific 102
  • Notes to Chapter II 197
  • Chapter III War and Strategy 213
  • Notes to Chapter III 255
  • Epilogue 263
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index of Names 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.