The Struggle for the Pacific

By Gregory Bienstock | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

LET us look once again at the map of the old world which has been before us throughout this investigation. On it Europe appears as a small, highly organized peninsula of the great Asiatic continent; beside the other peninsulas--India, Asia Minor, and Indo-China. The fortunes of the European peninsula have always been and still are, in fact, to-day perhaps more than at any time in the past, inseparably connected with those of the motherland of Asia.

The more closely we study the map the more clearly is revealed the peripheral character of our world, "Europe proper," which lies between the North Sea and the Dnieper, for neither the British Isles nor the Soviet Union can be regarded as parts of "Europe proper."

The farther the axis of world politics shifts toward the Pacific region the greater becomes the significance of such entities as the Soviet Union and the British Empire. Both the British and the Russians are at one and the same time Europeans and Non-Europeans. Their interests are divided between Asia and Europe, and hence their special and very complicated position in European politics.

From the standpoint of a continental European, Germany is to-day the central political entity which is exposed to pressure from all sides and which in reaction exercises counter-pressure in every direction. From the standpoint of world politics, Germany is on the periphery, and it is rather Russia which can lay claim to be considered a central Power, Russia, which since Peter the Great has been exposed to pressure from Europe in the west and from Asia in the east.

Similarly hybrid is the position of England which is to no greater extent a European than an Indo-Pacific Power. England's sphere of domination envelops Eurasia from the south and from the Indo-Pacific region, just as Russia encircles Eurasia from the north. The pressure exercised by these two

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The Struggle for the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Preface 9
  • Contents 13
  • List of Maps 15
  • Chapter I- The Pacific World in the Making 17
  • Notes to Chapter I 95
  • Chapter II- Rivalries in the Pacific 102
  • Notes to Chapter II 197
  • Chapter III- War and Strategy 213
  • Notes to Chapter III 255
  • Epilogue 263
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index of Names 289
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