Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life

By Perry Davis | Go to book overview

Partnerships for Housing

KATHRYN WYLDE

"Housing" appears on a local partnership agenda when the independent efforts of private enterprise and government fail to satisfy community needs for decent and affordable housing. In urban centers, evidence of this failure may include the highly visible presence of the homeless, dilapidated apartment buildings, and the more insidious phenomenon of middle-class families relocating from areas with a chronic shortage of housing and a lack of stable neighborhoods. The failure may also emerge in rural areas where the elderly are unable to keep up their homes, as well as in affluent suburban communities where the younger generation has been priced out of the local housing market. And, virtually everywhere, a disproportionately inadequate supply of affordable housing is apparent among racial and ethnic minorities.

Although the manifestations of housing problems vary among localities, solutions universally depend on the cooperative application of both public and private resources in some form of housing partnership. The concept of a public-private partnership in housing is a commitment to sharing development risk, financial obligations, and program responsibilities among government, private financial institutions, builders, developers, and — to the maximum extent possible — nonprofit organizations and the larger business community. This shared commitment and exposure to financial risk allows the community to form a consensus on a response to its housing needs. Successful program implementation generally requires a formal and institutionalized public-private vehicle, with a mandate to serve as the intermediary agent for all participants in the partnership program.

When interest rates and the national economy are relatively stable, a serious imbalance between housing needs and supply can be attributed to three conditions. First, the cost of building and maintaining housing exceeds what people can afford to pay for it (known as the "affordability gap"). Second, the cost of building and maintaining housing is greater than its market value, as determined by what people are willing to pay for housing in a given location. Third, the profitability of private development, ownership, or investment in housing is insufficient, often because of government-imposed regulation or taxation that is not offset by public subsidy incentives.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 161

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.