Governing New York State: The Rockefeller Years

By Robert H. Connery; Gerald Benjamin | Go to book overview

The State and the City

FRANK J. MACCHIAROLA

The relations between New York State and New York City are the product of a long and tumultuous history. Old political scandals, reform movements, party divisions, and power struggles of yesteryear all left their marks on the roles of the city and the state. The script is not a story of "good guys versus bad guys," but rather one of politics played against a background of economic realities. Relations today are tremendously complex chiefly because the state, especially under Governor Rockefeller's administration, at long last began to face urban problems. As pointed out elsewhere in this volume, after long periods of inactivity, the state moved rapidly and extensively into housing, health, mass transit, education, welfare, and planning. 1 Nowhere is this more evident than in the relations between New York City and the state. The interaction of these two governments can be seen first in a traditional legal context and then in their political and economic aspects.

The usual municipal experience has been one of restricted powers for cities and widespread rights of incursion into local affairs by the states. The almost universal operation of Dillon's Rule, which found cities without inherent rights and therefore "mere creatures of the state," acted to establish legally restrictive guidelines for municipal activity. Indeed, the view that cities were mere "municipal corporations," with only those powers granted in their charters, was endorsed

____________________
The author wishes to thank Stephen Berger, Carol Brownell, Dall Forsythe, and Ronald Stack for their helpful comments and suggestions.
1
See above, pp. 73-84.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Governing New York State: The Rockefeller Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Governing New York State: the Rockefeller Years *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors *
  • Preface *
  • Nelson A. Rockefeller as Governor *
  • The Governorship in History *
  • Patterns in New York State Politics *
  • Modernization of the Legislature *
  • The Administration of Justice and Court Reform *
  • The Changing Role of the States in the Federal System *
  • The State and the Federal Government *
  • State Aid to Local Government *
  • The State and the City *
  • Financing the State *
  • Higher Education *
  • The State and Social Welfare *
  • Public Employee Labor Relations under the Taylor Law *
  • Health Care *
  • Housing *
  • Attica and Prison Reform *
  • Public Transportation *
  • Elementary and Secondary Education *
  • Narcotics Addiction: the Politics of Frustration *
  • Environmental Protection *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.