Rebuilding Mostar: Urban Reconstruction in a War Zone

By John Yarwood Mbe; Andreas Seebacher et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Introduction

The purpose of this chapter is fourfold: first, to describe the history of Mostar until recent times; secondly, to describe the events of the wartime; third, to describe the physical damage; and finally, to describe the origins and purpose of the European Union Administration. The author is not an expert on the history and politics of the area, and this account is cursory. Many books are available which treat these matters in depth, but it is probably helpful nonetheless for the general reader to have a short introduction.


Mostar Before the War

Roman remains abound in west Hercegovina, and Christianisation was given impetus by the Council of Salona (now Solin, near Split) in 533, when the diocese of Sarsentium (perhaps at Cim, a suburb of Mostar) was founded. The leadership of the Church was taken by the Franciscans in the Middle Ages. Their position as defenders of the Christians was strengthened as a result of their persecution by the Ottomans in the sixteenth century. By this point, many local people had converted to the faith of the conquerors, and they naturally became a resented elite. This sort of long past conflict is once again much discussed, and now appropriated by politicians to define the identity of the group over which they wish to claim leadership. I was told by some people that the Bishopric was only revived in the early nineteenth century, and strengthened by the Austrians; the Franciscans had been closer to the people than the supposedly Hapsburg bishops, functioning as parish priests for centuries. Others dispute this interpretation, but in any event, there was an obvious running battle between the bishop and the monks, with the latter firmly committed to Croat nationalism.

When the Ottomans took over (1466 to 1468), the river Neretva was already bridged. The now famous Stari Most (Old Bridge) was built in 1566 by the architect Hajruddin, a pupil of Sinan. A typical Ottoman town emerged at this time on both banks of the river, with a bazaar, public baths, ham, thirty mosques, seven medreses, residential quarters or mahallas and fortifications.

From a peak around 1700, the slow decline of the town paralleled that of the Ottoman empire, until the Austro-Hungarians annexed Hercegovina on 5 August 1878. They brought new administrative and legal forms, new layout patterns with larger dimensions, new materials, eclecticism in design, newspapers, railways and

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rebuilding Mostar: Urban Reconstruction in a War Zone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 2 - The Human Factor 10
  • Chapter 3 - Organisation 16
  • Chapter 4 - Urban Planning 28
  • Chapter 5 - Project Management 36
  • Chapter 6 - Housing 46
  • Chapter 7 - The Work of Technisches Hilfswerk in Housing Repair the Human Factor 52
  • Notes by John Yarwood *
  • Chapter 8 - Health, Education and Other Building Projects 65
  • Chapter 9 - Demolition 70
  • Chapter 10 - Construction Industry Recovery 74
  • Chapter 11 - Urban Infrastructure 79
  • Chapter 12 - Conclusions 86
  • Appendix 1 - Project Schedules 95
  • Appendix 2 - Department Staff Listing 106
  • Bibliography 108
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 142

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.