Political Tendencies in Louisiana

By Perry H. Howard | Go to book overview

Preface

This volume, based to some extent on my earlier work Political Tendencies in Louisiana 1812-1952, is an expanded and updated study of Louisiana voting patterns. It owes its origin, and whatever may be its merit, to the continued interest taken in political ecology by Rudolf Heberle. Dr. Heberle, now Louisiana State University Boyd Professor Emeritus, has offered me inspiration, guidance, and warm friendship since first taking me as a green graduate assistant who showed an interest in Louisiana politics and believing in my potential as a political sociologist. His own stature as a sociologist, already known to his students, was recognized by his peers when Professor Heberle in 1967 was elected vice-president of the American Sociological Association. It is a pleasure for me to be able to record my indebtedness to him and to add the hope that this revised edition may contribute to the field of political ecology which he so ably pioneered.

The chairman of my department, Walfrid J. Jokinen, and my colleagues provided the kind of atmosphere that makes scholarly pursuit a pleasure. I also wish to acknowledge the summer research grant given in 1964 by the Faculty Research Council of the Louisiana State University Graduate School as well as one of the first relief-time grants in the spring semester, 1967, established by Dean Irwin A. Berg for the College of Arts and Sciences.

A number of graduate students have assisted me. Maryland Anderson and Kay P. Whyburn assisted at various stages of statistical analysis and map making, and made frequent trips to the library. To Robert M. Kloss goes special gratitude. Throughout the period of research and writing, and regardless of his other duties, Bob gave unstintingly of his time and effort. His enthusiasm for the project remained a constant source of encouragement.

I want to thank Lynn Davidson, Sally Smith, and Ida Crockett

-vii-

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