The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

sometimes their enemies, prevailed, till the year of the siege of Baddesdown-hill, when they made no small slaughter of those invaders, about forty-four years after their arrival in England. But of this hereafter.


CHAPTER XVII.
HOW GERMANUS THE BISHOP, SAILING INTO BRITAIN WITH LUPUS,
FIRST QUELLED THE TEMPEST OF THE SEA, AND AFTERWARDS
THAT OF THE PELAGIANS, BY DIVINE POWER.

Some few years before their arrival, the Pelagian heresy, brought over by Agricola, the son of Severianus, a Pelagian bishop, had sadly corrupted the faith of the Britons. But whereas they absolutely refused to embrace that perverse doctrine, so blasphemous against the grace of Christ, and were not able of themselves to confute its subtilty by force of argument, they thought of an excellent plan, which was to crave aid of the Gallican prelates in that spiritual war. Hereupon having gathered a great synod, they consulted together what persons should be sent thither, and by unanimous consent, choice was made of the apostolical priests, Germanus, Bishop of Auxerre, and Lupus of Troyes, to go into Britain to confirm it in the faith. They, readily complying with the request and commands of the holy Church, put to sea, and sailed half way over from Gaul to Britain with a fair wind. There on a sudden they were obstructed by the malevolence of demons, who were jealous that such men should be sent to bring back the Britons to the faith. They raised storms, and darkened the sky with clouds. The sails could not bear the fury of the winds, the sailors' skill was forced to give way, the ship was sustained by prayer, not by strength, and as it happened, their spiritual commander and bishop, being spent with weariness, was

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