The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX.
HOW THE SAME HOLY MAN, BEING DETAINED THERE BY AN IN
DISPOSITION, BY HIS PRAYERS QUENCHED A FIRE THAT HAD
BROKEN OUT AMONG THE HOUSES, AND WAS HIMSELF CURED
OF HIS DISTEMPER BY A VISION.

As they were returning from thence, Germanus fell and broke his leg, by the contrivance of the devil, who did not know that, like Job, his merits would be enhanced by the affliction of his body. Whilst he was thus detained some time in the same place, by illness, a fire broke out in a cottage neighbouring to that in which he was; and having burned down the other houses which were thatched with reed, was carried on by the wind to the dwelling in which he lay. The people all flocked to the prelate, entreating that they might lift him in their arms, and save him from the impending danger. He having rebuked them, relying on faith, would not suffer himself to be removed. The multitude, in despair, ran to oppose the conflagration; however, for the greater manifestation of the Divine power, whatsoever the crowd endeavoured to save, was destroyed; but whatever he who was disabled and motionless occupied, the flame avoided, sparing the house that gave entertainment to the holy man, and raging about on every side of it; whilst the house in which he lay appeared untouched, amid the general conflagration. The multitude rejoiced at the miracle, and praised the superior power of God. An infinite number of the poorer sort watched day and night before the cottage; some to heal their souls, and some their bodies. It is impossible to relate what Christ wrought by his servant, what wonders the sick man performed. And he, suffering no medicines to be applied to his distemper, one night saw a person in garments as white as snow, standing by him, who, reaching out his hand,

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