The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

was himself made pope, he perfected the long-desired work, sending other preachers, but himself by his prayers and exhortations assisting the preaching, that it might be successful. This account, as we have received it from the ancients, we have thought fit to insert in our Ecclesiastical History.


CHAPTER II.
AUGUSTINE ADMONISHED THE BISHOPS OF THE BRITONS TO CA
THOLIC PEACE AND UNITY, AND TO THAT EFFECT WROUGHT A
HEAVENLY MIRACLE IN THEIR PRESENCE; OF THE VENGEANCE
THAT PURSUED THEM FOR THEIR CONTEMPT.

In the meantime, Augustine, with the assistance of King Ethelbert, drew together to confer with him, the bishops, or doctors, of the next province of the Britons, at a place which is to this day called Augustine's Ac, that is, Augustine's Oak, on the borders of the Wiccii and West Saxons; and began by brotherly admonitions to persuade them, that preserving Catholic unity with him, they should undertake the common labour of preaching the gospel to the Gentiles. For they did not keep Easter Sunday at the proper time, but from the fourteenth to the twentieth moon; Which computation is contained in a revolution of eighty-four years. Besides, they did several other things which were against the unity of the church. When, after a long disputation, they did not comply with the entreaties, exhortations, or rebukes of Augustine and his companions, but preferred their own traditions before all the churches in the world, which in Christ agree among themselves, the holy father, Augustine, put an end to this troublesome and tedious contention, saying, "Let us beg of God, who causes those who are of one mind to live in his Father's house, that he will vouchsafe, by his heavenly tokens, to

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