The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

worship of idols, and renouncing his unlawful marriage, he embraced the faith of Christ, and being baptized, promoted the affairs of the Church to the utmost of his power. He also sent over into France, and recalled Mellitus and Justus, and commanded them freely to return to govern their churches, which they accordingly did, one year after their departure. Justus, indeed, returned to the city of Rochester, where he had before presided; but the Londoners would not receive Bishop Mellitus, choosing rather to be under their idolatrous high priests; for King Eadbald had not so much authority in the kingdom as his father, nor was he able to restore the bishop to his church against the will and consent of the Pagans. But he and his nation, after his conversion to our Lord, diligently followed the Divine precepts. Lastly, he built the church of the holy Mother of God, in the monastery of the most blessed prince of the apostles, which was afterwards consecrated by Archbishop Mellitus.


CHAPTER VII.
BISHOP MELLITUS BY PRAYER QUENCHES A FIRE IN HIS CITY.

In this king's reign, the holy Archbishop Laurentius was taken up to the heavenly kingdom, and was buried in the church and monastery of the holy apostle Peter, close by his predecessor Augustine, on the 4th day of the Nones of February. Mellitus, who was Bishop of London, was the third Archbishop of Canterbury from Augustine; Justus, who was still living, governed the church of Rochester. These ruling the Church of the English with much industry and labour, received letters of exhortation from Boniface, bishop of the Roman apostolic see, who presided over the Church after Deusdedit, in the

A. D. 619.

-92-

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