The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III.
HOW CEADD, ABOVE-MENTIONED, WAS MADE BISHOP OF THE
MERCIANS. OF HIS LIFE, DEATH, AND BURIAL.

At that time, the Mercians were governed by King Wulfhere, who, on the death of Jaruman, desired of Theodore to supply him and his people with a bishop; but Theodore would not obtain a new one for them, but requested of King Oswy that Ceadd might be their bishop. He then lived retired at his monastery, which is at Lestingaeu, Wilfrid filling the bishopric of York, and of all the Northumbrians, and likewise of the Picts, as far as the dominions of King Oswy extended. And, seeing that it was the custom of that most reverend prelate to go about the work of the gospel to several places rather on foot than on horseback, Theodore commanded him to ride whenever he had a long journey to undertake, and finding him very unwilling to omit his former pious labour, he himself, with his hands, lifted him on the horse; for he thought him a holy man, and therefore obliged him to ride wherever he had need to go. Ceadd having received the bishopric of the Mercians and Lindisfarn, took care to administer the same with great rectitude of life, according to the example of the ancients. King Wulfhere also gave him land of fifty families, to build a monastery, at the place called Etbearwe, or "The Wood," in the province of Lindsey, wherein marks of the regular life instituted by him continue to this day. He had his episcopal see in the place called Licitfeld, in which he also died, and was buried, and where the see of the succeeding bishops of that province still continues. He had built himself a habitation not far from the church, wherein he was wont to pray and read with seven or eight of the brethren, as often as he had any spare time from the labour and ministry of the word. When he had

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