The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

contagion of heretics, he gave this affair in charge to the most reverend Abbot John, then appointed to go to Britain. The synod we have spoken of having been called for this purpose in Britain, the Catholic faith was found untainted in them all; and a copy of the same given him to carry to Rome. But in his return to his own country, soon after crossing the sea, he fell sick and died; and his body, for the sake of St. Martin, in whose monastery he presided, was by his friends carried to Tours, and honourably buried; for he had been kindly entertained there when he went into Britain, and earnestly entreated by the brethren, that in his return to Rome he would take that road, and give them a visit. In short, he was there supplied with some to conduct him on his way, and assist him in the work enjoined him. Though he died by the way, yet the testimony of the faith of the English nation was carried to Rome, and most agreeably received by the apostolic pope, and all those that heard or read it.


CHAPTER XIX.
HOW QUEEN ETHELDRID ALWAYS PRESERVED HER VIRGINITY, AND
HER BODY SUFFERED NO CORRUPTION IN THE GRAVE.

King Eegfrid took to wife Etheldrid, the daughter of Anna, king of the East Angles, of whom mention has been often made; a man very religious, and in all respects renowned for his inward disposition and actions. She had before been given in marriage to another, viz. to Tondberht, chief of the Southern Girvij; but he died soon after he had received her, and she was given to the aforesaid king.

Though she lived with him twelve years, yet she preserved the glory of perfect virginity, as I was informed by Bishop Wilfrid, of blessed memory, of whom I inquired, because

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