The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II.
HOW BISHOP JOHN CURED A DUMB MAN BY BLESSING HIM.

In the beginning of the aforesaid reign, Bishop Eata died, and was succeeded in the prelacy of the church of Hagulstad by John, a holy man, of whom those that familiarly knew him are wont to tell many miracles; and more particularly, the reverend Berhthum, a man of undoubted veracity, and once his deacon, now abbot of the monastery called Inderwood, that is, in the wood of the Deiri; some of which miracles we have thought fit to transmit to posterity. There is a certain building in a retired situation, and enclosed by a narrow wood and a trench, about a mile and a half from the church of Hagulstad, and separated from it by the river Tine, having a burying-place dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, where the man of God used frequently, as occasion offered, and particularly in Lent, to reside with a few companions. Being come thither once at the beginning of Lent, to stay, he commanded his followers to find out some poor person labouring under any grievous infirmity, or want, whom he might keep with him during those days, by way of alms, for so he was always used to do. There was in a village not far off, a certain dumb youth, known to the bishop, for he often used to come into his presence to receive alms, and who had never been able to speak one word. Besides, he had so much scurf and scabs on his head, that no hair ever grew on the top of it, but only some scattering hairs in a circle round about. The bishop caused this man to be brought, and a little cottage to be made him within the enclosure of the dwelling, in which he might reside, and receive a daily allowance from him. When one week of Lent was over, the next Sunday he caused the poor man to come in to him, and ordered him to put his tongue out of his mouth and

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