Patriarchy and Incest from Shakespeare to Joyce

By Jane M. Ford | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1.
Frye, "The Archetypes of Literature", 91.
2.
J. Hillis Miller, "Georges Poulet's Criticism of Identification", 196.

Introduction
1.
Freud, "On the History of the Psycho-Analytic Movement", Standard Edition, 14:37 (hereinafter referred to in text as SE).
2.
Rudnytsky, introductory essay, in Rank, The Incest Theme in Literature and Legend, xx, xxi.
3.
Rank, The Incest Theme in Literature and Legend, 301. Translation from Rank, Das Inzest-Motiv in Dichtung und Sage, 369.

Der Inzest zwlschen Sohn und Mutter, sowie die ihn ersetzenden Phantasien, gelten dem Bewusstseon, zunächst wohl aus physiologischen Empfindungen, als schwereres Vergehen wie eine Verbindung von Vater und Tochter. Denn die innerliche köörperliche Blutsverwandtschaft, die den Sohn mit der Mutter verbindet, ist ja im Verhaltnis von Vater und Tochter nicht in dem Masse gegeben.

4.
Rank included Frau Inger of Oestraad, Ghosts, John Gabriel Borkman, Little Eyolf, The Master Builder, Peer Gynt, When We DeadAwaken, The Wild Duck, and Woman from the Sea, 542-48; 395-96; 559.

-171-

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Patriarchy and Incest from Shakespeare to Joyce
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • For Barbara, Bill, Brian, and Ann v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction - Fatherl/Daughter Incest 1
  • 1 - Some Literary Variations on the Incest Theme 17
  • 2 - The Triangle in William Shakespeare 36
  • 3 - The Triangle in Charles Dickens 54
  • 4 - The Triangle in Henry James 80
  • 5 - The Triangle in Joseph Conrad 100
  • 6 - The Triangle in James Joyce 120
  • 7 - Incest and Death 146
  • Notes 171
  • Bibliography 184
  • Index 199
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