The Language of the Civil War

By John D. Wright | Go to book overview

B

baa-lamb A child’s pet name for a lamb.

baby-house A common name for a dollhouse, since dolls were often called babies. At the Manhattan Fair of the SANITARY COMMISSION in New York on April 14, 1864, a Mrs. Chauncey sold her “baby-house” for $500.

back-out A slang word for cowardice or a lack of courage; e.g., “The sergeant has a severe case of back-out.”

back talk The common term for replying to a superior officer in an insolent way.

bad A slang word meaning the opposite, good. Incorrectly considered to be a modern usage, it was part of a slave’s GULLAH vocabulary, expressing approval of another slave who had done something bad in their master’s opinion. It was pronounced long—“baaaad.”

bad blood A common euphemism for syphilis.

bad-box A person was in a bad predicament when he was “in a bad-box.” A soldier caught asleep on picket duty might tell his fellows he was now in a bad-box.

bad egg A dishonest, good-for-nothing, or evil person, e.g., “They shot Yates for desertion, but he wasn’t such a bad egg.”

bad nigger A complimentary term originally used by southern slaves and northern blacks for a black person, usually a man, who resisted white oppression. This was a hopeless and dangerous gesture on plantations but won the special admiration of the slave community.

baggage smasher A humorous slang name for a rough and careless type of person.

bag of wind A derogatory nickname for loud or pompous talkers. It was secretly given to Union Major General John Pope by his fellow officers.

bag the enemy To capture the enemy. The expression was often applied to a surprise flanking movement and march into the rear of the enemy, whose cannons are pointing away from the attack. The theory was good, but the “bagging procedure” seldom worked if the enemy had a larger force. Trains and military equipment could also be “bagged.”

bail one’s own boat To take care of one’s own fate or business without waiting for

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Language of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Guide to Related Topics xv
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 50
  • D 81
  • E 100
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 138
  • I 154
  • J 161
  • K 166
  • L 172
  • M 184
  • N 202
  • O 208
  • P 221
  • Q 242
  • R 245
  • S 259
  • T 293
  • U 308
  • V 314
  • W 318
  • Y 329
  • Z 332
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 378
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.