The Language of the Civil War

By John D. Wright | Go to book overview

F

Faber No. 2 A popular brand of pencil, especially favored by northern journalists covering the war.

face the music This expression, still meaning to face up to unpleasant consequences or punishment, was coined in the U.S. about a decade before the war. It has been associated with “THE ROGUE’S MARCH,” which was used to drum a soldier out of the service.

facing Trimming on a uniform, as on the collar and cuffs. The style was prescribed, but officers were often inventive, especially in the war’s early days.

fagged out A slang term for being fatigued or worn out; e.g., “How could Old Pap march us all night and not expect everyone to be fagged out?”

falderal or folderol 1. Complete nonsense, especially foolish talk or ideas; e.g., “The war was lost, but President Davis was still full of falderal about saving the cause.” 2. A trinket or trifle; e.g., “His sister gave paper flowers and other folderols to soldiers at the hospital.”

fallen angel A euphemism for a prostitute. In 1863, the Washington Star estimated that central Washington, D.C., had about 5,000 prostitutes, with half as many more in Georgetown and Alexandria. See also clap; daughter of Eve; drab; fancy girl; fast house; gay young duck; “The Haystack”; “Hooker’s Division”; “Madam Russell’s Bake Oven”; parlor house; ranch; The Wolf’s Dream.

fallen into his last sleep A romantic euphemism for “died.” See also gone home; gone up.

Falls City The nickname for Louisville, Kentucky, which was a major Union army headquarters and supply depot throughout the war. The name refers to the city’s location by the waterfall of the Ohio River.

fancy A special photograph that was not the usual picture of a family member. These included photos of beautiful women, actors, outdoor scenes, and biblical and allegorical poses. Fancies were usually put on the last pages of photo albums.

fancy girl A euphemism for a prostitute. See also fallen angel. See also clap; daughter of Eve; drab; fallen angel; fast house; gay young duck; “The Haystack”; “Hooker’s Division”; “Madam Russell’s Bake Oven”; parlor house; ranch; The Wolf’s Dream.

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Language of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Guide to Related Topics xv
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 50
  • D 81
  • E 100
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 138
  • I 154
  • J 161
  • K 166
  • L 172
  • M 184
  • N 202
  • O 208
  • P 221
  • Q 242
  • R 245
  • S 259
  • T 293
  • U 308
  • V 314
  • W 318
  • Y 329
  • Z 332
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 378
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.